Mind Control or We’re All In This Together! Hurray!

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Student body assembled on the Carlisle Indian School Grounds.
Photo courtesy of Carlisle-www.army.mil

http://www.forcedschool.com/post/29270750776/destructive-mind-control-as-a-public-service

http://home.epix.net/~landis/histry.html

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courtesy http://www.tapeshare.com

6 thoughts on “Mind Control or We’re All In This Together! Hurray!

  1. It is rather an odd thing to do to children when you think about it, and photos such as these really underscore the point. We take the people with the most energy and enthusiasm for life and force them to sit behind a desk for hours and hours on end. And then we wonder why they grow bored. Its a strangely illogical world we live in.
    I’m by no means against education by the way, just the means of education as the majority of us know it. As you imply it seems to be geared towards stamping out individuality rather than encouraging it to grow.

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    • I believe in education, but my experience as a student, a teacher and a parent is that the public school system is terribly flawed. Lots of money is spent educating teachers how to push and shove the disinterested kids along, how to manage the herd when no one wants to really face the truth that some kids thrive at study. They don’t mind sitting for hours feeding their brain. What ruins it for them is that they must suffer fools. How many wasted hours the bright kids must spend waiting for the unmotivated to catch up (and they never really do, btw). The really bright kids, the motivated kids know when a teacher assigns a group project it really means the bright kid will do all the work and the others in the class will get a good grade to average into their abysmal test averages. I don’t blame the teachers. They’re forced to spend a fortune on Master’s Degrees in managing a rowdy herd. They try their best to make learning “fun” by watering it down, never really succeeding at inspiring kids who don’t care while letting the motivated kids languish. I’m 100% for meritocracy in education. People don’t want to be honest but national test scores are low because we close our eyes to the truth. I’ve had kids who LOVED research, reciting poems, doing science experiments etc. Those kids are to admired. In our society we value good feeling over truth. Some people are happier and better with their hands why should they be forced to endless years of boredom while they distract the other kids? Why should bad behavior be rewarded with more attention? These are things I think about all the time. This is not to say that you shouldn’t give kids a chance. But I think our idea of education is very narrow-minded. But then physical work is looked down upon. Sad really when the willingness to do physical work is one of the reasons the US was once great. Okay, so there’s a bit of a rant for you. 🙂

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      • I don’t consider it a rant at all, there’s far too much sound-biting on the internet for my taste, even here on WordPress. I appreciate you taking the time to explain your heartfelt views and suspect you have had a great deal more involvement with the education system than have I. My own brush with the educational establishment ended far too prematurely to be of much use to be over 40 years ago in an era that is long gone and a country in which I no longer reside, and my only contact with the American education system was via their brutal and indifferent treatment of my son – who has now thankfully extracted himself from their reign of terror!
        But I fully concur with your observations regarding the merit, or lack thereof, in ‘herding’ children through the mill of a blanket education system when the children themselves are as different as from one another as any other group of human beings whatever their age. I don’t suppose for a moment anyone would seriously consider forcing everyone to follow the same career path so why do we insist on shoe-horning our children into a rigid educational regime when clearly it cannot possibly be beneficial for all the children involved? I still recall the pain I endured (both emotional and physical – hitting children in order to get their attention was standard procedure in my day) throughout my ‘education’ when as a hopeless daydreamer all I could think of was how much I missed the world outside. No real thought went into why I thought this way, but the truth was I just wanted to be doing something with my hands, and feet!
        But why society holds ‘manual labor’ in such low regard has puzzled me all my life. I love nothing better than to sink into my chair at the end of the day utterly exhausted, refreshed from the shower and basking in the luxury clean clothes and a warm fire! I know this may seem odd to people but it’s what I truly believe I was put here on earth to do and I really wouldn’t have it any other way.
        So I’ll end with this: it’s taken from a post I blogged a few weeks back entitled Lucian Logic, I think it goes a long way to explaining some of the frustration I feel as a stone sculptor… working with my hands.
        ~~~
        (He’s pontificating about a sculptor by the way….)
        “No more than a workman, doing hard physical labor… obscure, earning a small wage, a man of low esteem, classed as worthless by public opinion, neither courted by friends, feared by enemies, nor envied by fellow citizens, but just a common workman, a craftsman, a face in the crowd, one who makes his living with his hands.”

        Lucian (AD120-200)

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      • My husband will like the quote! I also spent a lot of time in school daydreaming. I did well because I hated failing but underneath it all I resented every moment of school. 🙂

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  2. I love those old photos. I like looking into those innocent eyes and wondering what became of them..what sort of life did they have? Did they get married, have a family, grandchildren, did they experience passion, love, sadness, loss. Are there people looking at the photo now who can say that was my Grandma, Grandad, Aunty…
    So many stories!

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