So What if Your Parents Are Criminally Insane? Meet Buster the Wonder Baby!

Definitely looks insane
Definitely looks insane

“The most merciful thing that a large family does to one of its infant members is to kill it.”
Margaret Sanger, Women and the New Race 

I sort of get Margaret Sanger‘s bitterness. Her family arrived in the New World fleeing the Irish Famine (see the real and disturbing causes HERE). Her mother had 18 pregnancies and died young. So young Maggie gets it into her head that some babies are better off dead–not her, of course, but some other babies.

In Nicaragua I met a lot of unwashed, under-nourished children and not one of them asked me to put them out of their misery. In fact some had dreams of America or finding a cute boy to have a baby with (like people have done since the beginning of time). The girls liked having their nails painted and the boys were big flirts.

As a fifth grade teacher I met kids with alcoholic parents, criminal parents and neglectful parents. Some of these kids loved poetry and being read to.

Poor Maggie transferred her bitterness onto others. Yes, poverty is horrible, but it seems to me that extermination is a little worse (even if it’s done for the supposed good of the children or the environment). Case in point: Buster, the baby born to criminal parents who turned out alright.

While not quite insane, Buster looks like he could kill someone.
While not quite insane, Buster looks like he could kill someone.
But wait, he likes apples. There's hope!
But wait, he likes apples. There’s hope!
Buster rocking the short pants, but possibly still considering petty larceny
Buster rocking the short pants, but possibly still considering petty larceny
Buster turns towards the light
Buster turns towards the light
Life ain't so bad after all
Life ain’t so bad after all
Take thaat! You eugenicists!
Take that! You eugenicists! I look just like a young Prince William!

13 thoughts on “So What if Your Parents Are Criminally Insane? Meet Buster the Wonder Baby!

  1. What amazed me the most is all the pictures this youngster had taken of him. Isn’t that unusual, in the time?

    I like your reflections on other disadvantaged kids. Many of us didn’t have enough growing up and never knew it–no one told us!

    Good post, Adrienne.

    Like

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