U.S. Army Declines Request for DNA Test on Manassas Remains

Earlier this year, it was announced that two complete sets of remains had been recovered from what was believed to have been a U.S. field hospital used during the Battle of Second Manassas.

Dead Confederates, A Civil War Era Blog

Members of the 3rd Infantry Regiment carry the remains of two unknown Civil War soldiers to their grave at Arlington National Cemetery on Sept. 6. Associated Press/Cliff Owen

Earlier this year, it was announced that two complete sets of remains had been recovered from what was believed to have been a U.S. field hospital used during the Battle of Second Manassas. Paul Davis knew that a relative of his, a color sergeant in the Second Wisconsin Infantry Regiment of the Iron Brigade, had died under similar circumstances, and petitioned the Army to have a DNA profile run on the remains in hopes of identifying them. Several other families did, as well. The Army refused, saying in carefully-worded, anodyne phrasing that it wasn’t worth the expense:

The Army made the decision that the costs associated with obtaining, storing, and testing of the DNA from these two Unknown U.S. Soldiers was not…

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Luanne says:

    That’s pretty sad.

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    1. It does seem sad to me as well.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. What would be the point of DNA testing? They tried it once and apparently the results were disappointing. And it’s true that it would be virtually impossible to connect the results with anyone alive today. So does seem like an unnecessary expense. It’s not like anyone would still be alive who was looking for closure, as might be the case with a Vietnam-era soldier.

    Like

    1. Yes, but it pulls at my heart strings anyway. My cousin died and was buried somewhere in Virginia. I think of his family so far away. But, you’re probably right… sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

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